About the Owner diesel duck for sale

My name is David King. I have an Ocean Going Master License and have served as Captain on vessels up to 250 meters in length. Latterly I was charged with leading commercial divisions of Canada Steamship Lines in Sydney, Singapore and Vancouver. Although now retired it is safe to say the “sea is in my blood.” trawlers for sale Before I retired in 2011, I was determined to purchase an ocean going trawler that had the capability for SAFE worldwide cruising. I had a bit of experience in this regard; as Captain and latterly Vice President with Canada Steamship Lines, I saw multiple cases of purported ”ocean going yachts”, flounder at sea, or in rarer cases sink. Some of these had a happy ending as we were able to rescue crews and obtain medical services. Sadly, this was not always the case. While most of these incidents could have been circumvented with better voyage planning, many owners had no business being out on the sea, particularly with the boats that they had. It was clear to me that most boat owners were prone to marketing misinformation or simply budget constrained. In my quest for a boat, I had a reluctant partner and it was paramount that the vessel had to have luxurious amenities comparable to home, room for occasional guests, and superior sea keeping abilities, Unlike my partner, I was acutely aware that “shit” happens and for every eventuality there needed to be a backup plan. This is not unlike the professional Captain, he or she would not dream of making a decision without at least one alternative and preferably multiple alternatives to choose a different course of action. So what are the major risks on an extended ocean going cruise? I gave it some thought and drew up a list to better understand the risks and the corresponding mitigation strategies.
Risks  & Mitigation PDF
From my investigations in terms of safety, it was clear to me that I needed to concentrate on risks associated with Vessel Specific requirements, specifically, the most favorable yacht design to overcome: Non-forecasted Weather Flooding due to inability to evacuate storm seas/ breaching of exterior windows Hull Breached by Foreign Object Insufficient fuel capacity Damage to driveshaft/propeller I investigated five of the leading Trawler Manufacturers including the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462. Each of these manufacturers produce widely accepted trawlers that had mass appeal within the trawler community. None of the manufacturers that I investigated could advertise their mid-range trawlers (50’ class) as true worldwide ocean cruisers except the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462. When I think of weather, I think of extreme non-forecasted weather and its potential to be the pre-cursor for a host of events including jeopardizing the fuel reserves to the extent where the vessel runs out of fuel before the next planned port call. All of the trawlers I looked at had the option to install “get home systems” such as twin engines, or engines that ran off the shaft generator. Yet, none of the yacht designs considered, with the exception of the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462, a plan for prolonged self-sufficiency in the event of running or out of fuel. Not only did the Diesel duck have a “get home” easy to use sailing rig for extended range and stabilization, it also had approximately 1.5 times the diesel capacity of its nearest competitors! At the same time the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462 has a cruising range of approximately 7000 NM – adequate for a Pacific crossing. Most seemed inadequately designed to evacuate water in extreme sea conditions because of either/too many windows or the inability to segregate water tight compartments, particularly in the event of a collision bulkhead breach with a submerged container. The Diesel Duck 462 incorporated three water tight divisions within the vessel, with segregation being as simple as closing and dogging a water tight door in heavy weather. It also had a much better profile to evacuate shipped deck seas, with low bulwarks and heavy duty railings as opposed to fiberglass rails which were much more common on fiberglass trawlers. The all steel construction of the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462 was a logical choice over fiberglass given the frequency of collision with ocean debris. I felt it far more likely that the steel hull would survive a collision with a submerged log than a similarly deigned fiberglass hull. I also understood that regardless of how remote your location, you can generally easily and inexpensively repair a steel hull – I just did not have the same confidence in Fiberglass. In the end, I concluded that the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462 met all the criteria that I was concerned about as a Master Mariner and the “Duckin A’ is the culmination of that search – perhaps it will be yours as well!

About the Builder boats for sale by owner

Seahorse Marine is an American owned and operated yacht building facility in China specializing in the manufacture of steel yachts. These include a number of designs with the "Diesel Duck" range by George Buehler being their most popular. It is a private company owned by blue water cruising expert Bill Kimley and his wife Stella. Bill Kimley, is a former Californian boat broker who in the 1980s set out to investigate Taiwan's budding boat building industry, and subsequently pairing up with wife Stella to embark on building high quality, but affordable yachts in Mainland China . Through Bill’s passion for building quality vessels and Stella’s facilitation of the boatyard, they formed a maritime family business that delivers an exceptional product. Their two children Natalie and Fido are both active in the business and intimately involved with the day to day management at all levels of operation. The company is located in Zhuhai, Guangdong province, on the site of former Chinese government ship building yard and offers substantial facilities for steel construction. From a personal perspective, the yacht buying experience through Seahorse has been exceptional. The owners have incredible integrity and firmly stand behind the product they build. They respond on advice and parts requests promptly and professionally. Consequently Diesel Duck owners “Duckheads” tend to all be family sharing experience and advice to the betterment of the boat and community. I believe you will be hard pressed to find a disappointed Duck Owner – and this is a testament to Bill Kimley and the Seahorse team!

About the Designer

George Buelher wrote "The Troller Yacht Book. How to cross oceans without getting wet or going broke". The first edition of this book came out in 1999, with the 2nd edition published in 2011. The book tells George’s story and how his designs were inspired by the northwest (USA) Salmon Trollers (sometimes confused with "Trawler Class", but they are significantly different). Buehler did not invent the term "Troller Yacht" nor did he invent the idea of using their type as a model for a cruising yacht - but he did adopt the name to describe the philosophy of the long range power cruiser he was developing. In a nutshell, his theory was that a properly designed powerboat can be absolutely safe at sea, very economical to operate and at the same time be comfortable. The designs earned the name of "Diesel Ducks". The first was a 38ft design commissioned by a couple that were fed up with sailboats in general and the handling, structural and mechanical problems of their 45ft-imported sailboat in particular. Other designs have followed Diesel Duck 41, 44, 48, 462, and 382, 41-plus, 45-plus. To date the largest is Diesel Duck 71. Seahorse is currently finishing a 78 foot Buehler designed high latitude charted vessel. By far George’s most popular design was the Diesel Duck 462, which continues to be immensely popular amongst safety and value oriented yacht owners. Sadly, George died February 28, 2018 at age 69 of complications following an aortic aneurysm and emergency surgery. While George will be sorely missed amongst the trawler community, his legendary designs will continue to be a testament to simplicity and practicality.
Design and Plans PDF
Anchor Graphic | Diesel Duck Trawler for Sale | Boats for Sale | Trawlers
Risks  & Mitigation PDF
From my investigations in terms of safety, it was clear to me that I needed to concentrate on risks associated with Vessel Specific requirements, specifically, the most favorable yacht design to overcome: Non-forecasted Weather Flooding due to inability to evacuate storm seas/ breaching of exterior windows Hull Breached by Foreign Object Insufficient fuel capacity Damage to driveshaft/propeller I investigated five of the leading Trawler Manufacturers including the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462. Each of these manufacturers produce widely accepted trawlers that had mass appeal within the trawler community. None of the manufacturers that I investigated could advertise their mid-range trawlers (50’ class) as true worldwide ocean cruisers except the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462. When I think of weather, I think of extreme non-forecasted weather and its potential to be the pre-cursor for a host of events including jeopardizing the fuel reserves to the extent where the vessel runs out of fuel before the next planned port call. All of the trawlers I looked at had the option to install “get home systems” such as twin engines, or engines that ran off the shaft generator. Yet, none of the yacht designs considered, with the exception of the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462, a plan for prolonged self-sufficiency in the event of running or out of fuel. Not only did the Diesel duck have a “get home” easy to use sailing rig for extended range and stabilization, it also had approximately 1.5 times the diesel capacity of its nearest competitors! At the same time the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462 has a cruising range of approximately 7000 NM – adequate for a Pacific crossing. Most seemed inadequately designed to evacuate water in extreme sea conditions because of either/too many windows or the inability to segregate water tight compartments, particularly in the event of a collision bulkhead breach with a submerged container. The Diesel Duck 462 incorporated three water tight divisions within the vessel, with segregation being as simple as closing and dogging a water tight door in heavy weather. It also had a much better profile to evacuate shipped deck seas, with low bulwarks and heavy duty railings as opposed to fiberglass rails which were much more common on fiberglass trawlers. The all steel construction of the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462 was a logical choice over fiberglass given the frequency of collision with ocean debris. I felt it far more likely that the steel hull would survive a collision with a submerged log than a similarly deigned fiberglass hull. I also understood that regardless of how remote your location, you can generally easily and inexpensively repair a steel hull – I just did not have the same confidence in Fiberglass. In the end, I concluded that the Seahorse Diesel Duck 462 met all the criteria that I was concerned about as a Master Mariner and the “Duckin A’ is the culmination of that search – perhaps it will be yours as well!

About the Builder boats for sale by owner

Seahorse Marine is an American owned and operated yacht building facility in China specializing in the manufacture of steel yachts. These include a number of designs with the "Diesel Duck" range by George Buehler being their most popular. It is a private company owned by blue water cruising expert Bill Kimley and his wife Stella. Bill Kimley, is a former Californian boat broker who in the 1980s set out to investigate Taiwan's budding boat building industry, and subsequently pairing up with wife Stella to embark on building high quality, but affordable yachts in Mainland China . Through Bill’s passion for building quality vessels and Stella’s facilitation of the boatyard, they formed a maritime family business that delivers an exceptional product. Their two children Natalie and Fido are both active in the business and intimately involved with the day to day management at all levels of operation. The company is located in Zhuhai, Guangdong province, on the site of former Chinese government ship building yard and offers substantial facilities for steel construction. From a personal perspective, the yacht buying experience through Seahorse has been exceptional. The owners have incredible integrity and firmly stand behind the product they build. They respond on advice and parts requests promptly and professionally. Consequently Diesel Duck owners “Duckheads” tend to all be family sharing experience and advice to the betterment of the boat and community. I believe you will be hard pressed to find a disappointed Duck Owner – and this is a testament to Bill Kimley and the Seahorse team!

About the Designer

George Buelher wrote "The Troller Yacht Book. How to cross oceans without getting wet or going broke". The first edition of this book came out in 1999, with the 2nd edition published in 2011. The book tells George’s story and how his designs were inspired by the northwest (USA) Salmon Trollers (sometimes confused with "Trawler Class", but they are significantly different). Buehler did not invent the term "Troller Yacht" nor did he invent the idea of using their type as a model for a cruising yacht - but he did adopt the name to describe the philosophy of the long range power cruiser he was developing. In a nutshell, his theory was that a properly designed powerboat can be absolutely safe at sea, very economical to operate and at the same time be comfortable. The designs earned the name of "Diesel Ducks". The first was a 38ft design commissioned by a couple that were fed up with sailboats in general and the handling, structural and mechanical problems of their 45ft-imported sailboat in particular. Other designs have followed Diesel Duck 41, 44, 48, 462, and 382, 41-plus, 45-plus. To date the largest is Diesel Duck 71. Seahorse is currently finishing a 78 foot Buehler designed high latitude charted vessel. By far George’s most popular design was the Diesel Duck 462, which continues to be immensely popular amongst safety and value oriented yacht owners. Sadly, George died February 28, 2018 at age 69 of complications following an aortic aneurysm and emergency surgery. While George will be sorely missed amongst the trawler community, his legendary designs will continue to be a testament to simplicity and practicality.
Design and Plans PDF